Mocha Angels 365. Day 22.

Cleaning out, not simply cleaning up, your house helps you think more clearly. Too much stuff weighs you down, body, mind, and spirit. Even the simple act of vacuuming makes my space feel lighter. Yes, I have read Marie Kondo’s books and reviewed her Netflix show, “Tidying Up.” Yes, I’m on board the KonMari Method ™ train headed to Tidyville.

It’s more than that to me. Your house/apartment/rented room is your private retreat from the chaotic outside world. At least it should be. The stuff/things/items (and people) in your home should bring you happiness, joy, and contentment. (Things can also be practical. I don’t love my Phillips head screwdrivers, my toothbrush, or my printer paper. However, I’m glad they are there when I need them.) Getting rid of stuff and people in your house who weigh you down is a good thing. Say “thank you” to your things as you release them. And say “thank you” to the space you are creating for the new in your life.

A Year of Living Without (or Breaking the Chains of Resistance) December Update

The plan was to not watch the news this month. Unfortunately, I hit my head at work on a piece of exercise equipment Friday, December 6th. Ambulance ride, ER visit, concussion diagnosis. It was great…not. I was off work from that day until December 24th. When I wasn’t sleeping, I did watch television, and sometimes, the news.

I have watched much less news in January. What I have done is read articles at Good News Network and Good Black News. They both remind me that people are doing good in this world. It’s unfortunate that good news is buried at the end of all newscasts, local and national.

I had thought super briefly about working in broadcast news while I was in grad school in the late 90s. (That was my decade!) I met a former news camera man, Derek, while I was in school. He told me two things: 1) That I was too nice a person to work in the news business and to stay the hell away from it, and 2) Newscasts lead with death and destruction in order to scare viewers into buying things. Number Two tripped me out the most. We’re being scared deliberately with the intention of driving us to buy more “stuff” in the name of fake security? The older I get, the more his words make sense to me.

January’s challenge is no coffee. I have had coffee since January 1, but a lot less than normal. Post-concussion, I have had more energy and I’m sometimes not finishing my coffee. I have raspberry tea at work and my own mug, so that’s what I’m reaching for more often.

Original post: https://mochaangels.com/2019/11/01/a-year-of-living-without-or-breaking-the-chains-of-resistance/

Good News Network: https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/

Good Black News: https://goodblacknews.org/

Mocha Angels 365. Day 339.

Kindness begins at home. Be careful not to rush into healing the world before you heal yourself. That will create imbalance within your world and leads to resentment within.

It’s taken me a long time to understand this message. Learning how to slow down, not fill my days with extra “stuff to do” (even though I always have stuff to do), and turning off the TV (see my most recent Year of Living Without post), are slowly teaching me to be kind to myself.

More on this topic tomorrow.

A Year of Living Without (or Breaking the Chains of Resistance) November Update

Imagine my shock yesterday when I open an email from zen habits and the title is “Working with the Ebbs and Flows of Your Resistance.” I got the email on November 22. I didn’t read it until yesterday, November 29. Talk about right on time.

My challenge for November was to not eat nor surf the internet while eating. Sometimes I succeeded. More often than not, I did not succeed. I had no idea these were such difficult habits to break. I realized the noise from the TV or internet surfing distracted me from the present moment. Whether I was alone in a silent house, or in the house with my kids, or eating lunch at work, when I was eating, I wasn’t paying attention. I wasn’t enjoying the silence. I wasn’t enjoying the noise my kids make. I wasn’t enjoying my co-workers at lunchtime.

As zen habits Leo Babauta puts it: The resistance is simply our mind not wanting to do something that feels uncomfortable: anything uncertain, difficult, overwhelming, different than our normal way of doing things, awkward, painful, sad, lonely, stressful. It makes sense that we would avoid these kinds of discomfort.

Resistance is natural, just a sensation in the body that is a response to change, discomfort, uncertainty. Our minds have a hard time dealing with these things, because we like routine, comfort, certainty.

Here’s the thing: the resistance isn’t always at a constant, full-on intensity. Resistance ebbs and flows.

During the time resistance is at its peak, my task is to be aware of the resistance. Instead of running from it, I am to see how it feels. Is it pleasant or unpleasant? (Usually unpleasant.) I notice the intensity changes. The goal is to breathe through it. Smile. Dance. Laugh. Play music. Bring lightheartedness to the table.

So I will continue to focus on my food rather than television or the internet. This month, I am not watching TV except to check the weather. Originally, I wasn’t going to watch the news. I can’t avoid it at work as there are televisions everywhere. At home though, no TV for me. My kids will continue to watch it but I won’t watch any of my shows. I’ll update this challenge the first week of January.

Original post: A Year of Living Without

Leo Babauta’s Working with the Ebbs and Flows of Your Resistance.

Up next on Media Wednesdays: Three boards games that make great Christmas gifts. Wednesday, December 4.